The Second Amendment was NOT established for duck hunting, but for freedom!
December 29, 2004
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America’s Founders viewed the right to keep and bear arms as a God-given individual right to defend one’s person, family, property, and country.

They wanted an armed citizenry for three reasons:

  1. to help repel invaders;
  2. to help put down unlawful insurrections, and;
  3. to act as a check against tyranny within our own government.

Get the following books and learn the documented historical facts for yourself!

That Every Man Be Armed: The Evolution of a Constitutional Right

Screenshot 2016-03-24 at 9.52.03 AMby Stephen P. Halbrook

Written by Second Amendment attorney Stephen P. Halbrook, this book provides a definitive account of the individual right to keep and bear arms meaning of the Second Amendment. Must reading for those interested in defending our right to bear arms.

Paperback edition available here.

Kindle edition available here.

 

 

The Second Amendment Primer: A Citizen’s Guidebook to the History, Sources, and Authorities for the Constitutional Guarantee of the Right to Keep and Bear Arms

The Second Amendment Primer by Les Adamsby Les Adams. Provides a citizen’s guide to the Second Amendment. It is a “primer” because it is elementary. Chronologically arranged, it traces the development of the right to keep and bear arms from its birth in ancient Greece to its addition in the U.S. Constitution. Supplemental essays discuss the Second Amendment’s interpretation in today’s world from the viewpoints of both firearms enthusiasts as well as those who would limit the amendment’s purview.

Hardback and Kindle editions available here.

 

 

A Right to Bear Arms: State and Federal Bills of Rights and Constitutional Guarantees

A Right to Bear Arms: State and Federal Bills of Rights and Constitutional Guarantees by Stephen P. Halbrookby Stephen P. Halbrook

After a fascinating first chapter on General Gage’s disarmament of Boston, Halbrook turns to a state-by-state analysis of the state Bills of Rights, half of which were adopted in 1776. Madison clearly had over a decade of development by the states to draw upon for his formulation of the federal Bill of Rights. Halbrook sifts newspaper and other data to show that the individual rights interpretation was not new with Madison.

Hardcover available here.

 

 

Read more about 2nd Amendment issues here.

 

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